Courier Life’s
Sections

Things not to do in Denver when you’re on dope

Brooklyn Daily
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Brooklyn Daily on Facebook.

I was listening to an interesting discussion on the radio about four 18-year-old students in Atlanta. Two were high-school seniors approaching graduation and two were college freshmen making plans for their summer vacation.

Their intentions were to pool their money, share the driving, and make it all the way to Denver in less than 22 hours. Why are they going to Denver in the summer? Certainly not to go skiing. They are heading to a place where they can legally score all the pot they want and get high to their heart’s content.

But if their plan is to load up a large quantity and return home with it, watch out! Colorado state lines join seven different states — Nebraska, Oklahoma, Wyoming, New Mexico, Kansas, Utah and, technically, Arizona.

Four young men driving out of Colorado fit the profile, whatever that may be, and will be stopped by state troopers at the first “Welcome” sign at any of those states. Shep will sniff out the contraband which, while legal in Colorado, is not in most other areas. The grass will be seized, and while the Centennial State is raking in big bucks via the grass tax, the surrounding states will be making more by way of the heavy fines collected from the foursome and others.

Hey fellas, maybe you should think it over and spend your vacation in Disney World?

• • •

During the first four months of this year, the state of Colorado raked in $7.6 million in taxes for the legal sale of marijuana. We can only wonder how much the bordering states raked in by way of fines.

• • •

“If you don’t like the president you are a racist. That’s ridiculous. Perhaps you just don’t like his policies.” That was said by Alan Colmes. Yes, the Alan Colmes, left-winger, Democrat, Liberal, Progressive Alan Colmes. And yes! I do agree with him.

• • •

Ben D. e-mailed the following message to me: “We are told not to judge all muslims by the actions of a few lunatics, but we are encouraged to judge all gun owners by the actions of a few lunatics.”

• • •

Thirteen-year-old Samantha Pratts decided that her hair was a bit longer than she would like it to be. A quick trip to the hair salon and more than 10 inches was cut, properly prepared and, at her suggestion, mailed by mommy to an organization called “Locks of Love.”

To those of you who are not familiar with “Locks,” it is a charity that accepts donations of long hair. It provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children under the age of 18 who are suffering from long-term medical hair loss. Charity Navigator awards this group four stars for accountability and transparency and three stars overall. This is a great way to teach your daughters about charitable donations without having to take out your checkbook. I am StanGershbein@Bellsouth.net telling you that I am very proud of Samantha, my beautiful, intelligent, loving granddaughter. I love you Sam.

Read Stan Gershbein's column every Monday on BrooklynDaily.com.
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Brooklyn Daily on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

Shadrach A. Stanleigh from Boerum Hill says:
Dear Mr. Gershbein: If you think Alan Colmes is a "left winger", then you've been smoking something stronger than would be allowed in Colorado...or Istanbul...or Amsterdam! Puff well, Shad Stanleigh
May 21, 2014, 3:14 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynDaily.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynDaily.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

CNG: Community Newspaper Group